Thanks to the slew of shiny power tools that fill up shelves at hardware stores everywhere, you can build just about anything you set your mind to these days. Anyone can be a master craftsman with the right tools and a YouTube tutorial!

Still, there are people who like to do things the old-fashioned way. Take Chris, star of the “Chop with Chris” YouTube series. Without a single power tool, he’s created masterpieces that could go toe-to-toe with any machine-made mechanism or device.

Recently, Chris tackled a fallen tree stump with his hands-on MacGyver magic and turned it into something that’ll make you howl at the moon…

There’s a power tool commercially available for just about anything. Chopping, sawing, measuring: if you can name a function, something with a cord can probably do it. But the host of YouTube’s “Chop with Chris” didn’t really care about such things.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

On his channel, Chris posts videos where he builds incredible, hand-crafted items without the use of a single power tool. He’s created coffee tables, rocking chairs, and a bow and arrows without burning a single watt. Recently, he tackled this stump…

Chop with Chris / YouTube


Using little more than his trusty axe and hammer, Chris set to work. Over the course of 40 hours, he chopped, cut, tied, and sanded until he turned the walnut stump into an amazing, handy contraption you won’t believe!

Chop with Chris / YouTube

The first step in Chris’s reformation of this log was to split the thing in two. To do so, he utilized a pretty old-fashioned technique and jammed a few hand-crafted wedges into an axe-hewn crack on the stump.

Chop with Chris / YouTube


After numerous strikes to the wedges, the log split into three beams. As with most of the steps in this building process, you might want to check out the video at the end to see exactly how this was done…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

With the beams separated, Chris chopped and whittled the face of one of them. At this point, he was just trying to get the rough shape he wanted, which you can see in the next image. There was no need for perfection just yet…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Here was what the finished product from the beam chiseling looked like. He’d whittled the beam down quite a bit, but he was sure to leave that thicker section at the end. He headed indoors for the next step of his project. What was his vision?

Chop with Chris / Youtube


Inside, Chris did a little detail work on his freshly carved beam. He slid a file over the upward surface to eliminate splinters until he had, for the most part, a relatively smooth surface.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Whether Chris then split his beam into two symmetrical halves or created an identical second beam wasn’t clear in the video. Still, by this point, he now had two smooth, indented beams, ending in a slight lip. Any idea what he might have been making?

Chop with Chris / YouTube

The next part of the literal hand-crafting process required a brief diversion from the two just-carved beams. Using a rotting log he pulled out of the bushes, Chris started work on a handmade wood steamer. To do so, he first screwed a hole through the log.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

With a handsaw, Chris made a shallow cut into the end of the steamer stump, but he didn’t cut all the way through the wood! That was so he could then half-cut the face of the log with a chipper, leaving a doughnut of raised wood around the hand-drilled hole.

Chop with Chris / YouTube


Chris set the log aside and went rooting through a rust bin for something. Oddly, after pulling out a few iron doodads, he grabbed this old pipe, which was perhaps part of an old exhaust system. Then, it was time for the truly impressive work…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Next, he created a port on the bottom of an old tin washbasin and fit his exhaust pipe into the hole of the rotted stump. Now, if he lit a fire beneath the washbasin, the smoke would drift up through the pipe and out the log. Which led to the next step…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Out in the backyard, Chris placed the washbasin inside a cauldron filled with water and put all of that on top of a burning fire. Then, he attached the tree stump to a fat log that he’d drilled a hole through. Remember that doughnut lip? That was so it could fit perfectly into the hole he’d made on this new, bigger stump.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

With the fire roaring beneath the water-filled cauldron, hot steam drifted through the exhaust pipe and the rotted stump right into the fatter stump. Then it was time to slide those beams Chris first carved into the steam-filled stump hole.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

And would you look at that! Utilizing leverage and a few wooden pegs, Chris bent the lipped end of the beams he’d made earlier. It was crazy to think how much work went into just a small part of the final product. There was still so much more, too…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Hopefully, if you decide to tackle this project yourself, you have the same affinity for carving long, lipped beams that Chris did! Now that he had freshly bent beams, he carved two more of them—but these ones were much smaller than the first.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

What Chris did next could have probably passed for magic if you went far enough back into time. Using a tool he’d carved by hand (you’ll want to watch the video to fully understand), he placed uniform slots throughout the project’s body.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Next, Chris attached the smaller beams to the first beams with a little woodworking magic. The beams, which had been end-capped with special digits, slid into the previously-carved slots, and he locked them in place. Confused yet? It all makes sense in the end!

Chop with Chris / YouTube

After marking a few precise locations, Chris drilled holes into both the horizontal and vertical beams before threading flimsy, rope-like strands of wood through each of them. You might be able to see the final product shaping up now…

Chop with Chris / YouTube


As he entered the final stages of the project, Chris handcrafted a few more pieces, each just a little bit different in its own way. These would eventually become integral to the structure of the end product.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

The new pieces Chris carved fit perfectly between the vertical beams; however, not only did these beams maintain structural integrity, but they also held up the thin beams that Chris used for the floor of the final product.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

Again, Chris was an old-fashioned kind of guy, and for him, luxuries such as nail guns were just that: luxuries. Instead of nailing the floor beams in place, he actually tied them on with water-soaked fibers. By then, he was almost done…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

One last time, Chris had to fashion a few beams. In this picture, it was the two that crossed in the X-formation. As he did with the floorboards, he tied these beams together with string and then attached them to the final piece…

Chop with Chris / YouTube


Now can you guess what Chris built? It was a dog sled! Sturdy, huge, and without a single power tool, the sled was light enough to be picked up with one hand and easily transported to the snow. He just needed one more thing for this sled to work…

Chop with Chris / YouTube

That’s right: a dog! Chris harnessed up the ol’ family pooch and put him to work pulling the sled through the snow-packed terrain. Talk about handiwork! This thing not only looked great, but it actually functioned really well.

Chop with Chris / YouTube

When you check out the video below, you’ll see Chris’s impressive handiwork from start to finish (complete with a few special effects). In just three minutes, you’ll see him move and build in a way that’s almost magic. Seriously, this guy is a real pro—and he never needed one power tool!

Chris didn’t use a single watt of power to put this bad boy together. If you’re ever stranded on an island or desert, he’d probably be the best person to have at your side!

Share this masterpiece with your friends below!